View the video clips from the Changing Arctic Ocean programme below. They include short films made by scientists on-board the RRS James Clark Ross, cartoons highlighting different aspects of the programme’s science, interviews with scientists, and professional films.

They are also available to view on the YouTube “NERC Changing Arctic Ocean” play list.

"Into the Dark"

Battling subzero temperatures and forty-foot seas, a team of scientists embark on a perilous winter expedition into the darkest regions of the Arctic.

Their mission: to understand how trace amounts of light may be radically altering the mysterious world of the polar night. What they discover has implications for the global climate and the future of the Arctic.

Scientists from the Arctic PRIZE project participated on the Norwegian Arctic SIZE cruise to the Arctic Ocean, led by Jørgen Berge, in January 2018.

View the trailer below (1 min 39 s).

A production by Interdependent Pictures and UiT The Arctic University of Norway.
In association with Vox, GoPro, and Sony Pro USA
In partnership with The Changing Arctic Ocean Programme.
Directed by Michael O. Snyder.
Produced by Eli Kintisch and Michael O. Snyder
Musical composition by Christos Anestopoulos and BIIAS.
Cinematography by Michael O. Snyder, Barbara Oliveira and Eli Kintisch.
Edited by Michael O. Snyder.
Trailer by Chris Pickens.

Sea ice changes in the Barents Sea

Johan Faust (ChAOS project) has compiled daily sea ice change in the Barents sea from 2014 to 2019.

In the compilation, 0.1 second equals one day. The sea ice data are from the NSIDC/NIC MASIE product (https://nsidc.org/data/masie/). MASIE relies on data from the Interactive Multisensor Snow and Ice Mapping System (IMS) that runs at the National Ice Center (NIC). The IMS product uses several satellite data sources including passive microwave, but it is also based on visual analysis and other data sources and undergoes a form of manual data fusion. Resolution is 1 km.

Cop-e-dub

Copepods are the most abundant and fastest multi-cellular species on the planet, but they face an uncertain future, especially in the Arctic, because of climate change.

Jump aboard with Jordan Grigor and Kim Last of the CHASE project as they go in search of these tiny superheroes of the oceans.

The film was made by Andy Crabb at the Scottish Association for Marine Science.

How sea ice enriches chemical pollutants

Jack Garnett (EISPAC project) has produced a short 2-minute cartoon clip to explain the potential impact of melting sea ice on the release of chemical pollutants. The clip demonstrates how, in a warmer Arctic, the behaviour of these pollutants may be altered and lists the potential impacts on larger mammals (including humans!).

BBC News Live Interview with Yueng Lenn

Dr Yueng-Djern Lenn, co-lead investigator of  the PEANUTS project, gave a live TV interview to the BBC News Channel on Thursday 24 January 2019.

The interview focused on observations of how the Arctic Ocean is affected by climate change, with increasing incursion of warm, salty Atlantic waters into the colder, fresher Barents Sea.

The interview touched on the implications of this “Atlantification” of the Arctic Ocean for the formation of sea ice, regional weather and climate, and the exchange of gases with the atmosphere.

A clip of the interview can be viewed below.

Unfrozen – Reports from the Ice

On Friday 19 October 2018 in the  Howard Assembly Room in Leeds, Dr Christian März, lead investigator of the ChAOS project, gave a public lecture on “Unfrozen: reports from the ice”, describing his Arctic research and field work in the Barents Sea.

Colleague Dr Jenine McCutcheon joined him on the podium to talk about her research on the Greenland Ice Sheet. The event had a live link up with the British Antarctic Survey research station in Antarctica.

A video recording of the event can be viewed below.

ChAOS Cruise Barents Sea 2018

The ChAOS project’s summer 2018 cruise (JR17007) to the Barents Sea took place during July. ChAOS investigator Dr Johan Faust has put together a 5 minute video clip highlighting the 2018 science activities on-board the RRS James Clark Ross.

The ChAOS project focuses on the impacts of climate change on processes happening at the seafloor of the Arctic Ocean.

The music accompanying this clip is “Elea” by the artist WorakIs, from the album “Flocon de neige”.

THAW #1: What melting sea ice means for life in the Arctic

Several members of the Arctic PRIZE team boarded the RV Helmer Hanssen in Tromsø in the depths of winter in January 2018. They were investigating how marine organisms and ocean processes function during the Arctic winter.

Eli Kintisch, an American science journalist, sailed on the same cruise and filmed the scientists at work. From this, he has made the three videos to highlight how the Arctic is changing and the work being done by scientists to understand the impacts of change on Arctic marine life.

This video is part of a three-part series on the changing Arctic. Thanks to the Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting for supporting Thaw.

THAW #2: How a warmer Arctic could intensify extreme weather

Several members of the Arctic PRIZE team boarded the RV Helmer Hanssen in Tromsø in the depths of winter in January 2018. They were investigating how marine organisms and ocean processes function during the Arctic winter.

Eli Kintisch, an American science journalist, sailed on the same cruise and filmed the scientists at work. From this, he has made the three videos to highlight how the Arctic is changing and the work being done by scientists to understand the impacts of change on Arctic marine life.

This video is part of a three-part series on the changing Arctic. Thanks to the Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting for supporting Thaw.

THAW #3: Why Atlantic fish are invading the Arctic

Several members of the Arctic PRIZE team boarded the RV Helmer Hanssen in Tromsø in the depths of winter in January 2018. They were investigating how marine organisms and ocean processes function during the Arctic winter.

Eli Kintisch, an American science journalist, sailed on the same cruise and filmed the scientists at work. From this, he has made the three videos to highlight how the Arctic is changing and the work being done by scientists to understand the impacts of change on Arctic marine life.

This video is part of a three-part series on the changing Arctic. Thanks to the Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting for supporting Thaw.

THAW: Interview with Eli Kintisch, film maker

 

ChAOS project on World Water Day 2018

World Water Day is 22 March each year. The theme for 2018 is “Nature for Water” to encourage people to “look for the answer in nature”.

The ChAOS team have prepared a short video clip to highlight the impacts of climate change in the Arctic, using a video clip taken by ChAOS investigator Dr Johan Faust.

ChAOS project in the Arctic Ocean 2017

Investigating the Changing Arctic Ocean on the RRS James Clark Ross, CAO 2017, Barents Sea

A summary of a great 47 day research cruise on-board the Royal Research Ship James Clark Ross. We travelled more than 9000 km, almost reached the North Pole and consumed tons of steaks, snickers, twix and Nutella. We encountered spectacular wildlife and spend days and nights with hardcore mudding.

By Johan Faust, investigator on the ChAOS project

Interview with Dr Jo Hopkins - 1st Changing Arctic Ocean cruise

More than 20 researchers from 16 UK research institutes joined forces on board the RRS James Clark Ross to investigate the knock on effects of rapid warming and sea ice loss in the Arctic region. The first research expedition to the Barents Sea took place between 30 June and 15 August 2017.

Arctic PRIZE: The Longest Day

This film was made during the 24 hour daylight of the Arctic Spring, when life blooms again after the darkness of the Polar winter. It was filmed and edited on board UiT The Arctic University of Norway’s research vessel Helmer Hanssen in April and May 2018 during the spring cruise of the Arctic PRIZE project. This project is observing biological, chemical and physical changes in the Arctic region, as the speed of climate change quickens. Arctic Prize, led by the Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS), with UiT The Arctic University of Norway as the main international partner, is funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) as part if its Changing Arctic Ocean programme. The film like the project was a collaboration directed by SAMS’ filmmaker Andy Crabb with contributions from marine scientists, technicians and ship’s crew. Thanks to Florence and the Machine and Universal Music for permission to use the music. “NO LIGHT, NO LIGHT written by Isabella Janet Florentina Summers, Florence Leontine Mary Welch. Published by Universal Music Publishing Ltd. on behalf of itself, and Florence + The Machine Ltd.”

Interview with David Wilcockson